That soul-destroying, meaningless, mechanical, monotonous, moronic work is an insult to human nature which must necessarily and inevitably produce either escapism or aggression, and that no amount of “bread and circuses” can compensate for the damage done—these are facts which are neither denied nor acknowledged but are met with an unbreakable conspiracy of silence—because to deny them would be too obviously absurd and to acknowledge them would condemn the central preoccupation of modern society as a crime against humanity.

E.F. Schumacher, Small Is Beautiful

(via kellyhavens)

(Reblogged from kellyhavens)
The world would be better off,
if people tried
to become better.

And people would
become better
if they stopped trying
to be better off.

For when everybody tries
to become better off,
nobody is better off.

But when everybody tries
to become better,
everybody is better off.

Everybody would be rich
if nobody tried
to be richer.

And nobody would be poor
if everybody tried
to be the poorest.

And everybody would be
what he ought to be
if everybody tried to be
what he wants
the other fellow to be.
Peter Maurin, Easy Essays

 

anndruyan:

This is a summary of college only using two pictures; expensive as hell.

That’s my Sociology “book”. In fact what it is is a piece of paper with codes written on it to allow me to access an electronic version of a book. I was told by my professor that I could not buy any other paperback version, or use another code, so I was left with no option other than buying a piece of paper for over $200. Best part about all this is my professor wrote the books; there’s something hilariously sadistic about that. So I pretty much doled out $200 for a current edition of an online textbook that is no different than an older, paperback edition of the same book for $5; yeah, I checked. My mistake for listening to my professor.

This is why we download. 

(Reblogged from thepeoplesrecord)
“…irony, entertaining as it is, serves an almost exclusively negative function. It’s critical and destructive, a ground-clearing…irony’s singularly unuseful when it comes to constructing anything to replace the hypocrisy it debunks.”
That was it exactly - irony was defeatist, timid, the telltale of a generation too afraid to say what it meant, and so in danger of forgetting it had anything to say.
David Foster Wallace (in quotations) and D. T. Max (via crematedadolescent)

(Source: bright-young-thing)

(Reblogged from the-babbling-book)
It’s not just e-mails. Unreturned phone calls, texts and messages via social media can be just as irritating. But I’m going to concentrate on e-mails because for most people (teenage sons excepted), they are the most common tool of business and personal communication.
A large part of the problem, said Terri Kurtzberg, an associate professor of management and global business at Rutgers Business School, is that in face-to-face or phone conversations, “it’s clear how long a silence should last before you need to respond,” she said. “There’s no norm with digital communication.”

The Anxiety of the Unanswered E-Mail - NYTimes.com (via infoneer-pulse)

There is something alarming about this report. Crafting norms on the internet is apparently quite difficult.

(via chrischelberg)

(Reblogged from truth-has-a-liberal-bias)


This machine allows anyone to work for minimum wage for as long as they like. Turning the crank on the side releases one penny every 4.97 seconds, for a total of $7.25 per hour. This corresponds to minimum wage for a person in New York. This piece is brilliant on multiple levels, particularly as social commentary. Without a doubt, most people who started operating the machine for fun would quickly grow disheartened and stop when realizing just how little they’re earning by turning this mindless crank. A person would then conceivably realize that this is what nearly two million people in the United States do every day…at much harder jobs than turning a crank. This turns the piece into a simple, yet effective argument for raising the minimum wage.

This machine allows anyone to work for minimum wage for as long as they like. Turning the crank on the side releases one penny every 4.97 seconds, for a total of $7.25 per hour. This corresponds to minimum wage for a person in New York. This piece is brilliant on multiple levels, particularly as social commentary. Without a doubt, most people who started operating the machine for fun would quickly grow disheartened and stop when realizing just how little they’re earning by turning this mindless crank. A person would then conceivably realize that this is what nearly two million people in the United States do every day…at much harder jobs than turning a crank. This turns the piece into a simple, yet effective argument for raising the minimum wage.

(Source: bencrowther)

(Reblogged from truth-has-a-liberal-bias)
(Reblogged from realworldnews)

stopkillingourworld:

thepeoplesrecord:

These are all pictures that have been posted on the Rising Tide North America Facebook page (links: Facebook | Twitter | Website)

On the last image:

15 dead, 150+ injured, dozens still unaccounted for & possibly dead. No Osha inspection since the 80’s, ammonia-smell complaints in the early 2000s that ended with a report from the plant that claimed there was NO risk for fire.

I want to know why all of the force of the American Military Industrial Complex was directed at finding Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, but no one seems to be talking about holding the people & policies accountable for the ending of 15+ real human lives who did not have to die. The thoughts & dreams & possibilities of those real human lives did not have to end.

Can we PLEASE talk about some justice in this society, some logical policy changes that can save lives, and about challenging the system that makes this kind of injustice go unanswered, putting people before profits at the cost of human lives again & again?!!

We do talking about just that every damn day right here on STOP.  But it’s going to take much more than talk to make a difference.  

The people killing the earth are not CEOs and politicians.  It’s us for letting it happen.

Start with divesting your money.

(Reblogged from stopkillingourworld-deactivated)
If you’re told what to look for, you can’t see anything else. So one thing is to see, in a way, without words…. Once you have an idea, or somebody tells you something to look for, that’s about all you can see. I had this experience recently: A dear friend of ours has been diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, and I hadn’t seen her for about six months. And when she came and visited, I couldn’t see her anymore. I could only look now for symptoms, how the dementia was manifesting itself. I couldn’t see her through any other lens but the possible symptoms. And that one word, that one piece of knowledge totally corrupted every time I looked at her.
(Reblogged from infoneer-pulse)
The work of the eyes is done. Go now and do the heart-work on the images imprisoned within you.
Rainer Maria Rilke